Plan Your Event with Social Media

by admin on April 15, 2014

Social Media is great for looking at cat pictures, taking quizzes to find out what character you are, or getting into arguments with strangers. But it can also be incredibly useful if you’re planning a big event. Let’s take a look at how.

Facebook: More and more, Facebook is becoming a place to share links and get information on businesses and organisations. So this is a great place to look at pictures from events thrown by other local organisations. Not only should you like or follow other organisations to build community, but you should be aware of their event pages, too. This way you can get more information on upcoming events and take a look at pictures when they’re posted. Make sure to like their links and updates so you can see their information as it comes up.

Twitter and Instagram:  While these two sites are very different in terms of posting — Twitter relies on 140 characters typed while Instagram posts pictures — they both rely on something we’ve all seen: #hashtags. While hashtags may seem annoying to those who don’t use them, they’re incredibly useful in searching for information. Hashtags are a way to link similar terms together. Say it’s October and you’re throwing a Breast Cancer research fundraiser. Searching for #breastcancer or #breastcancerawareness can lead you to other users with similar goals. A Twitter search may lead you to more links and/or small pieces of information, while Instagram will show you pictures users have linked to that topic.

Pinterest: Pinterest has become a valuable resource for anyone planning a wedding, so it makes sense that it can help you plan your fundraiser. Users can create boards for certain topics, say Floral Inspirations or Amazing Invitations. They pin links with pictures to keep similar  information together. You can browse pins, boards, or pinners (users) to try to find inspiration for your own event. Create a board so you can keep all your event information in one place.

No matter what you choose to use, social media can easily become a rabbit hole where we lose track of time. I like to set a timer if I’m looking for specific information with a goal in mind. Be smart about search terms, try many out, and keep your information organised. Social media can be a fun and easy way to take your brainstorming to the next level.

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Raise Money Before the Big Day

by admin on March 25, 2014

Fundraising and event planning can be stressful, but very, very rewarding. If you have an event coming up and you want to get a jump start on your fundraising goal, get creative! Raise money before the event so guests won’t feel like they have to give when they’re at your event, having a good time.

Here are a few suggestions.

Text a Donation: Many charities have worked with phone companies to set up special texting services that raise money for your organisation. Send out an email or facebook blast a few days before the event. Encourage guests to text the provided number to donate a small amount ($5-15). The price for the service is minimal, the charge shows up on the guests’ phone bill, and it takes less than a minute!

You can even keep it going at the event. Announce during the event that you’d like to raise a certain amount in the next 10 minutes, give your guests the number, and watch them reach for their phones!

Online Auction: Are you hosting an auction or raffle? Post the items online so donors can browse the selection and see what others are bidding. Announce certain items via social media to get your guests talking about the auction. Anticipation for the items will build in the days leading up to the event, leading to higher donations, with a final rally for bids at the actual event.

Start a Social Media Campaign: Encourage supporters to use social media to spread the word about your upcoming event. Promote last minute tickets sales by sharing links on Facebook, and offer free tickets to one lucky person who likes, shares, or comments on your link. Create a fun hashtag for guests to use on Twitter and Instagram. Tell guests to take a picture of their event ticket or invitation and post it on Instagram. Suggest that your guests bring a +1 (partner or friend) to your event on Google+.

Don’t pressure yourself to reach your entire fundraising goal at your event. Your guests want to have a great time while supporting your charity. Encouraging early donations can take that pressure off during the event so you can truly celebrate your work and your supporters. Have fun and raise that money!

 

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Behind the Ticket Sales: The Days and Minutes before the Event

In last week’s post, we discussed all the planning that goes into creating a memorable primary school fete. By this point, you know what you’re going to do. Once all the plans for your big school fete are in place, all you’ve got to do is ensure that everything is executed smoothly.

Step 5: Lend a Hand?

The Fete Planning Committee has likely already taken on many roles. Now you need to reach out for more volunteers to keep the days’ events flowing. Make a list of all the jobs that need to be filled—stall roster, floating roster, ticket sellers—and begin to circulate a sign-up sheet, asking parents and other supporters to volunteer an hour or two of their time.

The important thing is to ask everyone personally to help. It’s harder to say no to an individual, even if they’re on the phone, than it is to a newsletter or email. Contact every parent and explain that you’re asking for a very small time commitment. Pair experienced volunteers with new ones, and don’t give anyone more work than they can handle. Their volunteer experience should be fun and rewarding.

Step 6: The Clock is Ticking

The day before the fete, get into motion. Here’s a short checklist of things to be done in the hours before the fete begins:

  • Mark out the site with spray paint or chalk
  • Set up tables and chairs, stalls and tents
  • Electrician set ups any needed electrical cables
  • Operators may wish to set up rides in advance
  • Designate a central station for children to drop off cakes
  • Collect float and change from the bank and store securely
  • Volunteer can sleep at the site for overnight security

Now you’re ready! You’ll likely spend a great deal of time the day before the fete running about with the vague feeling that you’ve forgotten something, and that you’ll never finish in time, but, if you have done your planning and created a fete committee on whom you can count, this surely will not happen!

Next Week: It’s Fete Day!

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Watch This Space!

by admin on March 8, 2011

Who hosts the most fabulous events?

Is it you and your organisation? If not, it could be!

Starting soon, Ticket River and the Event Ticket Printing blog will be searching for stories just like yours from event planners all across the continent. We want to know what works, what doesn’t work, and how others can enjoy your success (or avoid your failures). Every week, we’ll work to feature one amazing party, festival, gathering, gala, fair, celebration, concert, performance: essentially, if you’re selling event tickets, we’d love to hear your story.

Interested in participating? Just drop us a note, courtesy of this blog, and tell us why your recent or upcoming event should stand as the model for the rest of the country. Whether it’s an unqualified triumph or an abject fiasco, let us know what you’ve learned, and what others can learn from your experience, and we might devote an entire post to you! We’ll also be contacting other Ticket River customers so you can learn even more about how to host an exceptional event.

Selected events will be profiled on this blog, along with links back to your own sites and any pictures you’d like to share. We’ll be interviewing customers to learn what they know and sharing that knowledge so our readers can plan for the future and fulfill their dreams by holding the top events, and featured organisations will receive some extra incentives to make their next event even better!

What’s good for you is good for us. Smooth events that run the way they’re planned keep everyone happy. Let’s share our knowledge and experience!

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The Hottest Ticket This Christmas

by admin on November 29, 2010

Did you remember to plan ahead?

If your Christmas celebration is to serve as a fundraiser for your favourite charitable organisation, don’t forget to print your own event tickets online. It’s a brilliant way to save you time and money. Your personalised event tickets will be printed quickly and shipped right to your door, so you can start selling seats sooner. Custom printed free ticket templates in full colour or black and white help you send a proper message: we’re ready for a party!

What sort of service will the best ticket manufacturer offer? Besides free designs and fast delivery, you can expect standard security features such as individual numbering to help keep your event safe and secure. In addition, matching event kits allow you to promote the festivities with invitations, posters, and more. You can even add a prize draw to the gala with matching raffle tickets, which you can sell in advance to earn even money for your charity.

Party planning can be complicated, but event ticket printing is easy!

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Don’t Scare the Money!

by admin on October 26, 2010

Are you selling as many Event Tickets as you could?

Nonprofit organisations often depend on successful charity events to balance their operating budget every year, and the success of your events depends on the connection you’ve made with your donors. Here are 3 mistakes that some groups make: ways to drive supporters away instead of keeping them close.

Too much data: Are you making your supporters work too hard? Rather than inundating everyone with every minute detail, to the point where your emails and newsletters become unreadable, keep your missives short and sweet. Choose a few heartwarming anecdotes rather than pages of numbers. Make the numbers available for those who want them, but use your regular communication to make people feel good about supporting you.

Just waiting: No matter how wonderful your website, you can’t sit back and wait for people to find it. Paid links aren’t necessarily the answer either. Your best bet is to go out and find your supporters. Research forums where like-minded people congregate and leave insightful and thought-provoking posts and comments, along with a link back to your main site.

Self-centered: You have definitive ideas about your mission, but if you’re fund raising, a little flexibility can make a world of difference. How can you reach out to your donors and let them make your mission their own? Let them own your charity: put the donor first so they really believe they are making a difference through their donations.

Don’t alienate your base! Keep them close, so that when you start selling Event Tickets to your upcoming charity gala, they’re ready to line up to show their support!

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Beyond the Dinner Dance

by admin on September 16, 2010

Organisations that offer multiple levels of access, such as museums selling day passes and yearly memberships along with special levels of association for big donors, do well to consider those extra perks that might make larger donations worthwhile. As a member of various nature groups, I receive several invitations a year to upscale members-only events, where guests are always treated like royalty, and a good time is guaranteed.

While annual charity fundraisers are always enjoyable, I especially prefer purchasing Event Tickets to those special events that provide members with an extra sneak-peak: a party in conjunction with (and in advance of) a larger happening at the venue.

Does your group plan certain yearly events, some of which are free to the public, and some of which are included in the cost of the ticket at the gate, or available for a small additional cost? I have in mind my local botanical gardens. Every spring, they host an unusual plant sale, where strange and noteworthy specimens, suitable for indoor growing or outdoor planting, are offered. Around the same time, they open their wonderful seasonal butterfly attraction. The plant sale is free (held in the car park) and anyone may shop. The butterfly exhibit costs a little extra beyond the price of admission, although it’s free for members.

It makes good sense that they’ve combined these two interesting attractions for a members-only event that takes place before either event is open to the public. It’s a charity dinner with music, dancing, drinks, and a prize draw, but the events provide an extra twist. In addition to the typical entertainment, members are able to shop the unusual plant sale before the general public has a chance to buy up all the best plants. Also, they are provided with a behind-the-scenes tour of the butterfly exhibit! Lepidopterists are on hand to answer questions.

That’s how to keep your guests feeling like VIPs and encourage them to dig deep to support you. You give them something a little extra for the price of admission and they’ll provide you with the same!

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All Together Now

by admin on August 24, 2010

Planning a charity event? The perfect combination of charity, venue, sponsor, and entertainment can benefit everyone involved, long after the event ends. Here’s how:

Your charity stands for something. You know what it is, and so do your supporters. Your event should earn money for your charity through Event Ticket sales, and it should entertain your supporters, but it should also attract new supporters, provide exposure for those who give generously of their time, and, if you are clever about it, really benefit your sponsors as well.

Rather than renting out a hall, perhaps you can make a deal with a popular local venue. Do you already have a relationship with a particular pub? Is it located in the centre of things, near foot traffic and other night spots? Ideal! Rather than paying the full fee to rent a space and hire people to serve drinks, you can hold your event in a pub. They’ll benefit from increased drink sales during your event. If you’ve chosen a good location, you and the venue can benefit as passersby see there is something special going inside and decide to check it out.

If you can find performers that support your charity or relate to it, they may be persuaded to donate the evening’s entertainment in exchange for the exposure. New bands may be happy to perform, but think outside the box. Does your charity help animals? Perhaps you can work with the local human society. An animal fashion show or an adoption event may help everyone. Consider who can help, and how they might benefit.

As for sponsors, many local business are happy to donate their name and their goods to worthy charities. It’s wonderful exposure and good business. Selling Raffle Tickets with Event Tickets can help them earn more money and increase traffic to their shops. Simply being affiliated with your group can earn them goodwill, and, of course, their charitable donations should decrease their tax burden.

So, before you plan your next event, consider all the people you could be helping, and then plan accordingly.

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